Where you have been and what you have seen

Categories Traveller's Stories
  1. High and Dry

    I have been to Dubai a number of times, both working and on holiday. On this particular occasion, I took the subway to the Dubai Marina, an area I had not visited before. I arrived not long before the sunset and walked along the canals, through the many luxury buildings and restaurants, and then headed to the waterfront to look at the view. The lights of the buildings were starting to sparkle and the Dubai Marina skyline looked stunning against the changing colours of the sky. From where I was standing, I was amazed at how dazzling the views were and extremely happy to have my camera to hand to capture this scene.

    Dubai Marina is an artifcial canal district, still in development, built as a residential neighbourhood
    Dubai Marina is an artifcial canal district, still in development, built as a residential neighbourhood
  2. Giant appetite

    We were in Chengdu and spent a day volunteering with giant pandas. It was an incredible day where we managed to get up close and personal with these beautiful creatures. We were able to clean out their enclosures and feed them. It was after we had left fresh bamboo in their enclosures that I looked back and saw this panda on its back eating – what a photo opportunity! I couldn’t believe my luck. Even now it makes me smile when I look at the photo. It reminds me of the fun we had helping to look after the pandas. I have very fond memories indeed of our experience with them in Chengdu. It was so worth visiting.

    Giant pandas, whose diets are more than 99 per cent bamboo, originate from just a few mountain ranges in central China
    Giant pandas, whose diets are more than 99 per cent bamboo, originate from just a few mountain ranges in central China
  3. Bearing fruit

    We asked our guide to take us to an area in the Mago National Park in the Omo Valley where few tourists go, and he led us to a village far from the hub town of Jinka. We found the chief sat under a tree eating and we asked if we could take pictures. We took a lot of photos and, when we were almost ready to go, this beautiful girl came towards us with an amazing decoration of fruit on her head. She walked slowly towards me, and I was thrilled by her gaze. I took one or two shots and then she was gone. Now she stil looks at me through this picture, which hangs on the wall of my offce. She is one of my unforgettable memories of Ethiopia.

    Mago National Park has a rich diversity of ethnic groups, many of which maintain traditional nomadic lifestyles
    Mago National Park has a rich diversity of ethnic groups, many of which maintain traditional
    nomadic lifestyles
  4. Glided tour

    While staying on Inle Lake, my boyfriend and I took a tour of local sights in a traditional canoe. Our guide wanted to show us his village, Nampan, and it was by far our favourite part of the tour. The silky smooth water here perfectly refected the foating village, built entirely on stilts, and meant that I could hardly put my camera down until we left. This picture stood out to me when I looked through my photos because it features a gold pagoda – such an enchanting symbol of Burma.

    The mostly Buddhist people of Inle Lake subsist by farming on foating gardens, fshing, craft-making and tourism
    The mostly Buddhist people of Inle Lake subsist by farming on foating gardens, fshing, craft-making and tourism
  5. Steps back in time

    Modhera is famous for its Sun Temple. After visiting it, I was relaxing by the side of its famous well, when I spotted this little kid running down the steps. What really struck me is how her presence broke up the symmetrical patterns of the ancient stone. Needless to say, she was having a great time on the thousand-year-old structure. She was not aware of anything outside of her play, she was having such a ball.

    The Sun Temple in the northwestern state of Gujarat, built in 1026, is dedicated to the Hindu sun god, Surya
    The Sun Temple in the northwestern state of Gujarat, built in 1026, is dedicated to the Hindu sun god, Surya
  6. High light

    The charming village of Vík is known for its black-sand beach, and I spent some time photographing the contrast that the snow, sand and waves provided. As I headed back towards the path into the village, the landscape was bathed in a magical blue moonlight. Despite not being able to feel my fngers in the bitter wind, I was able to take this shot of the church up on the hillside. Seconds later, the light changed (as it seemed to so quickly in Iceland), but I’d already captured the moment perfectly.Where you have been and what you have seen (6)

  7. Eyed up

    Exhausted after a long train journey from Budapest, I made my way up to the Castle District and into the gardens of Wallenstein Palace, looking for respite. I turned the corner into the main gates and saw dozens of piercing blue eyes staring straight at me. I couldn’t help but feel wary in the presence of the garden’s make-shift security guards standing proudly at the entrance! It seemed that this peacock really knew his place within the palace.

    Indian peacocks’ colourful elongated trains are made up of more than 200 feathers, each ending with an ‘eye’ pattern
    Indian peacocks’ colourful elongated trains are made up of more than 200 feathers, each ending with an ‘eye’ pattern